Looking back: First parachuting stunt at the Arch ends in tragedy | Post-Dispatch Archives

The Gateway Arch, shaped like a magnet, exerts a powerful pull on pilots and parachutists. And long before Fair St. Louis featured sanction events, there  were daredevils who attempted to conquer the Arch on their own. He was Kenneth W. Swyers, 33, of Overland, who parachuted from an airplane on the morning of Nov. 22, 1980, and touched the top of the Arch. But before he could jump with a second parachute, he slid down the north leg of the Arch and struck the pavement. He was dead before anyone could rush to his side. Friends said Swyers hadn’t intended to land on the Arch but had merely meant to sail between its legs, as many a pilot had done before him. Four months before workers completed the Arch, the Federal Aviation Administration issued a stern warning to would-be stunt pilots: Don’t even think about it. The stunts began on June 22, 1966, when a twin-engined aircraft zipped beneath startled tourists at the top of the Arch. It took more than 50 years to reveal the name of that pilot. In 2016, Donna Dorris, from Madison, Ill., told the Post-Dispatch that her father, Earl Bolin, was the pilot. She said the family has held onto the story as a secret for five deca...

Draft No. VIII WGAE REG.NO.R07960-00 For Carrie Chapter One Below the thunders of the upper deep

Draft No. VIII WGAE REG.NO.R07960-00 For Carrie Chapter One Below the thunders of the upper deep Far, far beneath the abysmal sea His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep The Kraken sleepeth… Alfred, Lord Tennyson For as long as ships have plied the world’s oceans, sailors have returned from distant seas with terrifying tales of many armed monsters rising up from the abyss, attacking ships and devouring men. In the “Odyssey” the mythic beast was called “Scylla,” in Tennyson’s time, the “Kraken.” Generations have been horrified by Jules Vern’s nightmarish creature in “Ten Thousand Leagues under the Sea,” the Giant Squid. To modern biology, the world’s largest invertebrate is known as Archituethis–Greek for Ruling Squid. On November 2, 1878, an Atlantic Giant Squid became stranded in shallow water in the harbor at Thimble Tickle, Newfoundland. Three fishermen hooked onto the floundering animal with a grapple hook, which they tied with a line to a tree on shore, and then they waited for the tide to go out. At low tide the writhing creature lay marooned and doomed on the muddy flats. Its huge mantle measure...